Multimedia > Galleries

Wedding in a Rohingya Refugee Camp

IN PICTURES: teleSUR takes a look at how Rohingya in Myanmar and Bangladesh celebrate marriage.
galeria10
The bride
The bride's hands are covered with decorative patterns inked in henna, the groom is perfumed and the guests feast and dance the night away in a colorful tent. In most ways, the happiest day of Shofika Begum and Saddam Hussein's lives mirrors that of couples getting married the world over. Photo:Reuters
Shofika has make-up applied by her brother
Shofika has make-up applied by her brother's wife. Photo:Reuters
Saddam works at his family’s shop at the Kutupalong refugee camp.
Saddam works at his family’s shop at the Kutupalong refugee camp. Photo:Reuters
Saddam, whose family were shopkeepers in Myanmar, said they fled after military forces burned their homes. He lost touch with Shofika for a couple of weeks during that chaotic period, but they were reunited in Kutupalong camp. Three months later, they are celebrating their wedding.
Saddam, whose family were shopkeepers in Myanmar, said they fled after military forces burned their homes. He lost touch with Shofika for a couple of weeks during that chaotic period, but they were reunited in Kutupalong camp. Three months later, they are celebrating their wedding. Photo:Reuters
A Muslim cleric (right) officiates the prayers and performs the religious ceremony to marry the couple in a small tent decorated with blankets in vibrant patterns. Only men attend this ceremony.
A Muslim cleric (right) officiates the prayers and performs the religious ceremony to marry the couple in a small tent decorated with blankets in vibrant patterns. Only men attend this ceremony. Photo:Reuters
Shofika cries as she leaves a tent with her relatives on her wedding day.
Shofika cries as she leaves a tent with her relatives on her wedding day. Photo:Reuters
Men are served first, then the women sit down and lastly, the children eat. The free meal is distributed to children in plastic bags, but a scuffle that erupts means that some of it ends up in the mud.
Men are served first, then the women sit down and lastly, the children eat. The free meal is distributed to children in plastic bags, but a scuffle that erupts means that some of it ends up in the mud. Photo:Reuters
"Here, at least, we don
"Here, at least, we don't have to pay", Saddam says, when asked how he feels about getting married at the camp, explaining that the administrator in their village had asked for a payment of 500,000 kyat ($370) from couples wanting to wed. After everyone has had their fill, the long tables and plastic chairs are removed, and a loudspeaker is hooked up. Photo:Reuters
A professional dancer and his two assistants take to the floor with flashy moves to warm up the crowd. Soon, everyone is clapping and getting on their feet.
A professional dancer and his two assistants take to the floor with flashy moves to warm up the crowd. Soon, everyone is clapping and getting on their feet. Photo:Reuters
The happiness of their wedding day belies the uncertainty that Saddam and Shofika feel about their future in the overcrowded refugee camp.
The happiness of their wedding day belies the uncertainty that Saddam and Shofika feel about their future in the overcrowded refugee camp. Photo:Reuters
Published 1 January 2018
Galleries galerias telesur

Comment
0
Comments
Post with no comments.