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  • Mexico's government goes through a severe trust crisis, particularly President Enrique Peña Nieto, whose poor handling of the crisis prompts demonstrators to ask for his resignation.

    Mexico's government goes through a severe trust crisis, particularly President Enrique Peña Nieto, whose poor handling of the crisis prompts demonstrators to ask for his resignation. | Photo: Reuters

Published 17 December 2014

The move by the EU nation comes in the midst of allegations that Mexican federal police were involved in the Iguala massacre.

Arguing that “the human rights situation in Mexico is disastrous,” the opposition in the German parliament will present this Thursday three motions designed to suspend negotiations of a security agreement with Mexico, and to force the German government to adopt a critical stance following the disappearance of 43 Ayotzinapa teachers’ college students in Iguala.   

Tom Koenigs, representing the Green Party, is scheduled to unveil a document regarding the lack of human rights in Mexico. The report considers the Iguala case not as an isolated incident, but as the tip of the iceberg of what is happening in the Latin American country.  

The Left Party spokesperson Heike Hänsel will likewise present a motion to suspend the security agreement with Mexico and urge Germany, as a European Union member state, to lead in the cancellation of the Global Accord and that future collaboration with Mexico is conditioned with clauses that protect human rights.  

The Greens pointed out that Germany has not fulfilled its specific responsibilities toward Guerrero, as it was assigned to maintain ties with the the Mexican state by the EU.

“WIthin the EU, Germany is responsible for the state of Guerrero, and therefore, Iguala. Point blank: in relation to Mexico, Germany has not lived up to its expectations as an EU member state,” said Green delegate Hans-Christian Ströbele.

“There is only one way we can work together and that is if Mexico democratizes its security forces. And of course, we can work together in eradicating torture, for instance. This would be a first step and in that case, we would agree to send experts and jurists specialized in this issue, but this condition is still not included in the present security convention. [...] Mexico needs a far-reaching reform in its security forces,” he said.

Explosive allegations published in Proceso, one of Mexico's leading news weeklies, this past Sunday, revealed strong evidence pointing to direct participation of federal authorities in the alleged killings of the education students in the drug war-torn state of Guerrero.

The investigation also revealed that Mexican federal, state and municipal authorities were tracking the exact movements of the students on the same night of the massacre in question this past Sept. 26.

During an Oct. 5 press conference in the German Congress, Ströbele had already challenged the German federal government’s role in continuing dialog with Mexico on the security agreement after the students went missing on Sept. 26 in the midst of violence in Iguala.

Mexico: Federal agents said to have participated in Iguala attack

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